Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints

Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints

Is Mormonism a Protestant denomination? This handbook details Mormon belief and reveals how it diverges significantly from Christian orthodoxy.

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3 Responses to Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints

  1. Zig Gey says:
    101 of 116 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    So Why Are Mormons Upset About This?, February 15, 2006
    By 
    Zig Gey (USA) –

    This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
    The book merely outlines Mormon belief and responds with orthodox Judao-Christian theology. Why does this mean the authors are their enemies? I grew up in this church and know what I was taught and the authors do not misrepresent anything. I’m also rather amazed at the claims of some of the reviewers regarding the early Christian church and the Bible being translated over and over again by priest after priest. The Bible, whatever version, was translated from the original into English, and the New Testament is, in fact, the record of Christ and His church after His death. Other records also exist. There are, of course, different interpretations and different creeds, but there is no evidence that God reached down from on high and “removed” His church from the Earth and that “truth” depends on arcane organization or hand-shakes or obscene hugs and annointings or that a priest, or a bishop or even a pope has some sort of special powers, like a magician’s license.

    And since I spent so much of my first twenty years attending classes and seminary and sunday school and fast and testimony meeting and the dreaded stake conference, I can speak (for you Mormons, make that “spake”) or testify in court if you’d like that Mormon’s regularly misrepresent the theology of Christian churches, and in fact, say that the Roman Catholic Church and by association all other apostastolic churches are the “Church of the Devil”. Pretty ugly stuff that! This book, by contrast, is at all times respectful, while challenging the Mormon’s theology.

    I notice that those who give the book one star, advance the odd idea that challenging someone’s ideas and scholarship constitutes “persecution”. Good grief. Talking openly about ideas, religion, politics, history, etc. etc. is called freedom, and the absurd notion that disagreeing with a church’s tenents constitutes enemy status is frankly scary. That, dear hearts, is the reasoning the Kremlin used to put people in Gulags and the German’s used to put everyone but Arians into death camps. Mormon’s are the ones inviting investigation and publication of their beliefs because they are sending their missionaries out two-by-two to gain converts without telling them the whole story. Looking into those beliefs is called “fact finding”.

    As a supporter of free exchange of ideas and views (that freedom thing again), I also have an interest since as a taxpayer, the rest of us get to take up the slack for the 10% being given to a church which does no good works outside their own flock. Not only don’t they have an equivalent to Mother Theresa, there’s also no efforts similar to the Salvation Army.

    This book is a must if you’re considering conversion, and for Mormons, I would think they’d WANT to know the arguments against their beliefs, if for nothing else, so they’d have a better concept of why Christians consider them a cult and Catholics and Methodists require rebaptism if a Mormon joins those churches. How can Mormons insist they’re Christians when they don’t comprehend why others consider them a cult?

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  2. D. Burkhead "script kiddie" says:
    74 of 95 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Falling on Deaf Ears, December 11, 2001
    This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
    I’ve read some of the reviews here that continually blast this work. It’s sad because most of these bad reviews are from Mormons who disagree with the authors for fear that the authors may be correct. The authors were extremely fair in presenting their well-documented evidence; unfortunately the evidence conflicts with Mormon beliefs, ergo reviews of cynicism followed. Those few Mormons who can read this book and not have the automatic reflex of dismissing it as “anti-Mormon” might actually glean some relevant information about the LDS Church. I’ve studied the LDS Church and each time I come across a work by non-LDS authors dealing with the LDS Church, the Mormons seemingly always display an “us verses them” mentality (the reviews here are case-in-point). This work provides great information and should be read by all interested in or a member of the LDS Church. Hopefully one day, books that speak fairly of the Mormon Church will not fall on the deaf ears of its members.

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  3. Bradley P. Rich says:
    70 of 91 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Fair Look at Mormon Theology, January 6, 2002
    By 
    Bradley P. Rich (Salt Lake City, UT USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Mormonism 101: Examining the Religion of the Latter-day Saints (Paperback)
    As someone who was raised as a Mormon, I have been surprised at how little serious theology is done inside the Mormon church. The current president of the church admitted on a national televison interview that he didn’t know much about theology. I have always suspected that the church was unprepared to come to grips with changes in theological positions over the years, and hence, chose to ignore it. Outside analysis has been strident, and frequently generated more heat than light over these issues, leaving the reader to wonder about the fairness of the analysis.
    Mormonism 101 avoids the combative tone and for the most part, gives accurate positions for Mormon theology. They expose many of the flaws and inconsistencies in Mormon doctrine. Recognize that their analysis is designed to show that Mormonism is not a Christian religion and to sell the reader on the alternative belief system, Christianity, and that the authors’ analysis showing that alternative Christian beliefs are somehow better may leave the skeptical reader cold. Those caveats notwithstanding, this is a good introduction to the problems that infest Mormon theological underpinnings. This book is highly recommended, but is less useful as a general introduction to Mormonism than Mormon America by Richard and Joan Ostling, which is the best general introduction to Mormon history, theology and power structure. Nevertheless, well worth reading!

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